College Planning Specialists

September 24, 2008

Emily Chang: Your Resource To New Applications in Web 2.0 World

If you are a college or high school student reading this post you better get with one major reality that is beginning to shape the world you will be job hunting in soon: Web 2.0 information is critical to your career. Your job as a student is to learn and become knowledgeable in your major.

Your job as a smart student is to begin branding “You” long before you leave college. If you are not writing a blog you should be right now. If you don’t feel you have the time or discipline, then you should be creating a profile (rich version of an advertisement or resume) and placing it on the major Web 2.0 niche sites and social sites.

Research Tool

Emily Chang, MIT graduate, award-winning web and interaction designer, technology strategist and co-founder of Ideacodes, a design and web consultancy in San Francisco has a very cool tool for you to keep up with new applications: ./emilychang eHub. This tool announces new Web 2.0 applications and provides a short description as well as reviews.

Feed Reader For App News

This site acts like a feed reader of constant news about the latest and greatest applications to come out of the minds of entrepreneurs. Why is site important:

1. Great content ideas

2. Great tools to help you in your business

3. Features and Reviews

4. Cutting edge and timely information

5. Interviews with entrepreneurs and industry superstars

6. Submit a Site allows you to send your site or your favorite new tool for exposure

7. Tech Events and News

Follow Emily on twitter

profile image twittering: finishing up a style guide. it’s cool to be working with someone again that i worked with ten years ago.

July 11, 2008

Student’s Marketability Factors: 2 Critical Skills You Must Have Before Leaving School

To often college professors and the self ingratiating scholarly types, who pride themselves on academia, miss the mark when preparing students for the “nuts and bolts” business world that awaits them.

Let me help you with my opinion gleaned from years of corporate America battle wounds.  You will make yourself more marketable, more desirable to firms, and a highly sought after candidate if you develop the following 2 skills:

#1 The Written Word

Your ability to put pen to paper, fingertip to keyboard, or ink to grease board is the most critical skill employers are beginning to demand in college grads entering the job market. Can you write a grammatically correct sentence? Can you punctuate that sentence properly and spell without errors? Can you perform these basics while utilizing and displaying a broad vocabulary in your writing? Finally does your writing deliver the message intended in a succinct manner?

#2 The Spoken Word

Can you relate your thoughts, your message, and your purpose in a public speech? Are you comfortable providing information, direction, or analysis to a room full of peers-or worse yet superiors?

Public speaking, often ranked as the #1 or #2 fear in America, is a huge component to your success. If you can master this skill, you will differentiate yourself over your competition

Final Final

Our next article will provide you with resources on how to hone your writing and speaking skills, where to find resources to get over the fear(s), and tools you can utilize that will help you grow into the “expert” you hope to emulate

April 16, 2008

College Student Marketability Tool #1: Learn How To Be An Expert To Maximize Your “Employability”

If you believe that believing in yourself is a choice then you must understand how to begin the process. The first characteristic that shapes our reality is our self confidence. But how do you feel confident when you have never done something that feels so difficult like making a life change?

How Do I Build My Confidence?

1. Increase Your Knowledge and Expertise:

Take classes at a college, apply for an internship, or hire a specific expert
Read books, periodicals, online sources to supplement your base of knowledge
Understand that being an “expert” is defined by Websters as “skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.” You do not have to be a Ph.d; life experience and a willingness to learn will help you become an expert

2. Practice Your Craft:

Repetition and critiquing your performances are the mainstays of any effort to improve. By seriously practicing, being mindful of quality, and relentlessly striving to improve you will become an expert and build your confidence in the process

3. Offer Your Work For Free:

Give free workshops, tutoring, mentoring, or offer your resources to businesses. The key to offering your work for free is the priceless feedback and experience you gain from this activity

4. Find a Mentor:

Look for someone who is successful in your niche. Surround yourself with positive people. Allow their positive habits to rub off on you. Make the commitment to expand your base of friends and acquintances

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