College Planning Specialists

March 27, 2008

The “Attitude Crisis” Students Face: Tips For Maintaining Positive Energy

The following article is the first in a series of articles to help students and professionals maintain a positive attitude through positive thought process. This series will be authored by myself and Susan Hanshaw, inspirational teacher, coach and speaker. This article, written by Susan Hanshaw, gives steps you can take to make positive thinking a method to achieve happiness and relieve stress. Thank you Susan!

susanhanshaw.jpg

How do you maintain a constant positive thought process without letting the stresses of the outside world interfere?

Positive thinking really can become a habit if you work on it. It just takes practice. There are many things you can do to practice:

  1. Begin every day with some kind of practice that reminds you that whatever you manifest in your life begins as a thought in your mind. Your create your life through what you think about. Make a habit several times throughout the day to remind yourself by bringing this idea to your awareness.
  2. Be aware of your thoughts and the control that you have over them. If you catch yourself thinking negatively, stop the thought and replace it with a positive one.
  3. Approach your world from a place of gratitude. Focus as much as possible on all the things you have to be grateful about. It’s impossible to experience a negative thought while you are dwelling in gratitude.
  4. Develop a strong faith in the good of the Universe. Expect that all your needs will be met and that you have absolutely nothing to worry about.
  5. Think of your mind as a sacred place and protect it. Don’t allow yourself to participate in negative energy. Claim your power to change or remove yourself from negative environments.
  6. Look for beauty in everything you encounter.
  7. Think of your experience of life like starring in a movie that takes place in your mind. If you want to experience happiness, think happy thoughts. If you want to be miserable, fill your mind with negative thoughts.

Remember that you don’t have to put up with the negative thoughts that may seem to naturally dart through your mind. They may continue to show up uninvited, but that doesn’t mean you have to let them in the door to visit.

Thank you for visiting. Here’s to a life of richness!

Susan Hanshaw
innerarchitect.wordpress.com ; innerarchitect.com

susanhanshaw.wordpress.com

March 26, 2008

The Decision Crisis Student Face: Follow Your Interests and Passions

The credit crisis has now impacted the availability of student loans as more lenders drop out of the business. According to Net Worth’s Kathleen Pender “More than two dozen non bank lenders have stopped making college loans and last week, three large banks followed suit.” The fact that college tuition is spiraling upward with no end in sight, adds to the ever growing importance of a student’s career path decision making process.

What about the decision crisis that faces every student? Your decision making process for identifying the right career path is more important than ever. Unfortunately this process often begins in the middle rather than the beginning. Simply put many students and parents look at job markets, financial compensation, and job availability as the deciding factors on a career (major) path.

The First Step in the Decision Making Process

Before you consult the traditional counselors, career and interest surveys, and company representatives recruiting on campus consider the following:

1. Awareness: you will graduate to the workforce via corporate America or as an entrepreneur with a work life history that averages 40+ years

2. Interest: The career path you pursue should be one that holds your interest. It is imperative that students identify their all their interests. Make a detailed list of the things, activities, and rituals you enjoy. This is should help to heighten your awareness about what direction to take

3. Passion: After identifying your interests which are your passions? Which activity, subject, or ritual do you just love? Make a list of these “special” interests and consider them your detailed list moving forward

Discovering the correct career path (major) should start with the awareness that you will be spending the majority of your waking hours working. With this awareness you can then understand how important it is to find a career that you have interest and passion for in abundance.

By making this detailed list, students can take the first correct step to identifying the career that is right for them, the passion that will last a lifetime, and they can create a happier life from the beginning of their work life.

March 19, 2008

Is Your Fear of Money Forcing You To Choose The Wrong Major and Ultimately The Wrong Career?

Students and Parents pay attention to this story. . . Susan Hanshaw is an author, keynote speaker, and certificated minister. But Susan first began her work life in corporate America. She spent 20 years building a very successful career in the Direct Marketing industry culminating in a position as second in command of her firm with the title of Vice President.

Included in this rise to corporate stardom, was a high 6 figure salary, a stress level in line with the pressure an air traffic controller experiences, and the type of corporate “burn out” that plagues at least 50% of American workers according to Forbes: unhappy lives due to their jobs or the lack of purpose the job is missing.

As high school, junior college, college and university students–NOW–is the time to make the right decisions. Before basing the happiness of your life on your personal bank account, perks, or the prestige you believe will make you happy–take a closer look.

Examine your passions, your love of “what” you love, and investigate how you can turn a passion or love for something into a career that will energize your life.

Research your passion and create an intended action plan that will help you identify the correct major, identify the best career for your happiness, and that will ultimately help you attain this goal.

March 8, 2008

Student Tool Kit #2: How To Create The Life You Want Not The Life “They” Want

Chicago Sun Times published this article March 2, 2008

FoxBusiness.com published this article March 2, 2008

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world” Gandhi

“Bebop was about change, about evolution. It wasn’t about standing still and becoming safe. If anybody wants to keep creating they have to be about change” Miles Davis

“Everything changes, nothing remains without change” Buddha

College is the time of your life and the life of your time. The life of your time? What does that mean? As a 40 something consultant it is only recently that I have connected with my career purpose and path. I had success but I was one of the Forbes statistics:

Over 50% of Americans despise or dislike their job-career and never do anything about it.

We produced this video to give you a starting point from which you can begin to make the paradigm shift to new world thinking and creating the reality that you want in your life.

What is new world thinking? New world thinking recognizes that you choose what you experience through your consciousness. Literally, you create your own reality.

Simply put, the ability to influence your reality, your life, and your ultimate happiness is dependent upon your understanding and willingness to change. For more information: innerarchitect.wordpress.com

Student’s Tool Kit #1: Eliminate the 3 Roadblocks To Change

Do you often fall below your expectations, your desired results, and feel as if you are short changing your studies? Do you feel as if you should and can be a better student? Does your inability to flip a switch and achieve the goals you have set for yourself frustrate you–and your parents?

If you answered yes to any of these questions then you are a lot like me. I spent time feeling my career was without purpose, without goals, without direction, and stagnant with my intended-desire results unfulfilled. You are not alone. But I am here to tell you that you can change and achieve your goals and intended results–I found my path and the following information will get you there too.

Inspirational author Susan Hanshaw in her book, Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live, provides something that the brilliant writing of Deepak Chopra, Wayne Dyer, Marianne Williamson, Marc Allen, and Eckhart Tolle usually do not provide: how to steps that help implement change. The following is information that identifies 3 Roadblocks to Change and an exercise which helps you to begin to implement your action plan.

inner-architect-book-offer.jpg

3 Roadblocks To Change:

1. Fears about your ability to successfully create change

2. Limited beliefs about what you can achieve or who you can become

3. Commitment to taking the necessary steps

For the inner architect evaluation exercise-tool, Personal Steps For Change, which gives you the start to a plan of action to change your life, please request your free copy of Chapter 1 “Cultivating Your Mind To Consider Change.”

Email your request for a copy of Chapter 1 to: contest@innerarchitect.com.

March 5, 2008

Choice Is The Key To Change For Students: Do You Understand The First 3 Choices of Change?

Do you feel stuck, stagnant, or unable to move past an obstacle in your path? Have you ever stopped and asked yourself why you have these feelings? When you did this self evaluation, did you use past experiences or your belief system to answer what is wrong? The following information will help you to become aware of the fact that you hold the key to change. That key is the fact that you do have choices in life. As Susan says “You Always Have Choices.”

You Always Have Choices

According to Susan Hanshaw, author of the new book “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed to Live”, one of the most difficult ideas for people to understand and comprehend in order to take action is the idea of choice. For choice is the precursor to change, and as we can attest, sometimes change can be difficult even painful. If you are feeling stuck, if you are feeling lost, or if you are feeling your career has lost meaning, it is time too focus on the answer:

The First 3 Choices of Change:

1. Option #1: Keep everything Status Quo. Take no action and feel no differently

2. Option #2: Make an adjustment somewhere in an effort to influence positive change

3. Option #3: Let go of your job and find something that fits you better

Susan Hanshaw’s video, #2 in the series “Becoming an inner architect”, supports the idea of choice and the options of choice you now face. These concepts and steps were derived from Chapter 1 “Cultivating Your Mind To Consider Change.”

 

For details on Susan Hanshaw’s book “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live”, instructions on how to receive a free copy of Chapter 1 “Cultivation Your Mind To Consider Change”, and details about “The Apprentice Contest” reference “Inner Architect’s “How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live”: New Video Series, Contest, Book.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.